Queen's University — Since 1873
16th September 2011

Post-summer review

Exec drops Homecoming contract, plans to fill Queen's Centre spaces and rennovate Macgillvary Brown Hall

From left to right: Ashley Eagan, vice-president of operations, Morgan Campbell, president, and Kieran Slobodin, vice-president of university affairs won the AMS election on Feb. 3 with 63 per cent of votes and a 16-point platform.
From left to right: Ashley Eagan, vice-president of operations, Morgan Campbell, president, and Kieran Slobodin, vice-president of university affairs won the AMS election on Feb. 3 with 63 per cent of votes and a 16-point platform. (Justin Chin)

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After taking office in May, the AMS executive started to act on their 16-point campaign platform.

President Morgan Campbell, Vice President of Operations Ashley Eagan and Vice President of University Affairs Kieran Slobodin won the AMS election on Feb. 3 with 63 per cent of the student vote.

One promised initiative was the signing of a Homecoming contract between the AMS, the University and the city to outline each party’s expectations.

After sitting on fall planning committees, Campbell said the contract won’t go forward.

“It’s hard to nail down what the expectations are going to be given that there’s no set date for an event,” Campbell, ArtSci ’11, said.

The decision to cancel Homecoming until 2014 was announced in November last year.

Another of CES’s campaign points was to fill empty space in the Queen’s Centre with a grocery store and pharmacy.

In August, an agreement was finalized to put two new services in the spaces come October and December.

Due to legal reasons, the AMS is not releasing details about each new service, Campbell said.

“They’re going to fit the overall mandate of the Queen’s Centre very effectively,” Campbell said. “I can assure you that they are very student-focused and that students will be very happy with them.”

During the campaign period in January, a CES platform promise to bring a grocer to campus was questioned during debates. Currently, there is a city bylaw in place that doesn’t allow for a non-University owned grocer. During the campaign Campbell was adamant the bylaw wouldn’t pose a problem.

“There is a way to get around this and that’s through partnerships,” she told the Journal on Jan. 28. New this fall was a renovated AMS website, another platform point CES campaigned on.

“The $35,000 contract we have includes hosting and all the training of AMS staff for as long as we need it. This is really important because with a transition between each AMS executive, training can get lost,” Slobodin said.

Currently an online shopping section isn’t included on the website but plans are in place for it to be added this year. Students can shop at services like the Publishing and Copying Centre (P&CC), Yearbook Design Services and Tricolour Outlet and have items shipped to an address of their choice.

Another website feature will allow students to send their assignments to the P&CC online service to be printed. Then they can pick them up the next morning.

“This makes our services more accessible to students as well as to staff and to the Kingston community,” Eagan said.

Each service will have its own launch date on the website.

Team CES’s platform also included the renovation of Macgillivray-Brown Hall for AMS club use.

Following a flood over the summer, the bottom floor is being re-carpeted — a cost that was covered by insurance. Construction still needs to be done on the top floor to remove cubicles and make the gymnasium ready for clubs from Athletics and Recreation to use. The construction will cost a projected total of $30,000, with $15,000 to be spent this fall.

Eagan said the construction will be done by mid-October.

— with files from Katherine Fernandez-Blance

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